Top Tweets from #SHRM16

Top Tweets from #SHRM16

The Society for Human Resource Management’s annual conference has come to a close, with participants buzzing about talent analytics, interdepartmental collaboration, and learning opportunities for young leaders. This year, SHRM16 took place in Washington D.C., and hosted over 15,000 participants. Much of the conversation took place outside of the conference, however, on social media. HRmarketer reported the following analysis of #SHRM16 on Twitter: Total Tweets: 62,717 Total Unique Tweets: 30,769 Total Unique Users: 10,469 (number of unique Twitter accounts that published at least one tweet with #shrm16) Total Reach: 25,535,734 According to HRmarketer, the most popular tweet from SHRM16 was by Vala Afshar (@ValaAfshar), Chief Digital Evangelist @Salesforce: Train people well enough so they can leave, treat them well enough so they don’t want to. Here are some of our favorite tweets from SHRM16: People can only volunteer to innovate — you cannot force people to innovate. —Dr Linda Hill, @HarvardHBS #SHRM16 pic.twitter.com/svFoNpWSUx — Vala Afshar (@ValaAfshar) June 21, 2016 “Stop thinking of yourself as an HR leader. You’re a business leader who works in HR.” @JenniferMcClure #SHRM16 pic.twitter.com/Y7gogdvsHg — CareerBuilder (@CBforEmployers) June 21, 2016 “collaborate or die. this is the future of HR”. #shrm16#hrospic.twitter.com/EpSHPcVlWW — HROS (@HROpenSource) June 20, 2016 Getting ready to speak to 15,000 human resources professionals @SHRM #SHRM16 pic.twitter.com/LBywPIdKfm — Amy Cuddy (@amyjccuddy) June 20, 2016 “Great leaders create an authentic & engaging experience for their workers.” @mikeroweworks #SHRM16 RT if you agree pic.twitter.com/b9WrD4rZpa — CareerBuilder (@CBforEmployers) June 19, 2016 #SHRM16 Day 3 – Why HR Pros Should Care About the Political Climate https://t.co/GczWCQ1kCP pic.twitter.com/ApNO1UZpkN — Sharlyn Lauby (@sharlyn_lauby) June 22,...
Why Salesforce Doesn’t Have to be Just a Public or Private Cloud Transaction

Why Salesforce Doesn’t Have to be Just a Public or Private Cloud Transaction

In February 1999, Salesforce was founded with a mission to simplify customer relationship management (CRM) applications for customers, and it was provided as a service, versus installing software. They sent out the simple yet bold message of “No Software,” indicating that regular enterprises should not be installing, managing, and upgrading their CRM application, and should instead consume it as a service, leaving all the headaches to Salesforce. Guest article by Ajay Gulati, Co-founder and CEO of ZeroStack Now, let us compare a CRM application with a cloud and see which one is more complex: CRM Application Private Cloud One application Platform to run hundreds of applications Few services that need to work together Dozens of complex services needed to manage compute, storage, networking resources Controlled by a few admins Designed to provide self-service to developers Application needs to be highly available Cloud management software pieces need high availability in addition to applications Impacts one team May impact several teams in the company Backbone for sales Backbone for company’s IT Can be installed as one siloed application High degree of consolidation by design No matter which dimension you pick out of this table, a private cloud is much more complicated than a CRM application. This is not to suggest that CRM is easy or less complex to set up, but to highlight that private cloud is an even bigger beast to tame. This explains, to me, why the adoption of private clouds has been slower than public cloud. Here are some of the specific challenges in building a private cloud. Too many moving parts A private cloud consists of compute, storage, and networking resources along with the...
Salesforce Acquires Demandware

Salesforce Acquires Demandware

On June 1, 2016, Salesforce announced that it had entered into a definitive agreement to acquire Demandware. This announcement comes close on the heels of NICE Systems acquiring inContact and Vista Equity Partners acquiring Marketo. Demandware is an e-commerce platform that helps retailers manage content on their sites, plan and execute promotions, optimize prices, and personalize web experiences. Many of these capabilities already exist in the Salesforce ecosystem, however they are dispersed across products such as Marketing Cloud, Service Cloud, and Analytics Cloud. With yesterday’s announcement, Salesforce takes a step towards bringing the technical capabilities retailers need to manage digital conversations together in a unified platform. It also reflects the company’s roadmap for building vertical-specific cloud solutions. The first of these two were Financial Services Cloud and Healthcare Cloud, both of which were announced during Dreamforce 2015. Once Salesforce has successfully integrated Demandware’s capabilities into its current cloud-based offerings, we can surely expect the company to announce a “retail cloud.” A retail cloud aimed at blending traditional CRM and e-commerce capabilities would be attractive to retailers currently struggling with the integration of numerous point solutions. Indeed, according to Aberdeen’s latest customer experience management study, the lack of systems integration is the top challenge keeping retail executives up at night, especially when it comes to designing personalized interactions across multiple channels. We should also look at this acquisition in the context of the current competitive landscape. In 2013, SAP acquired Hybris – another large commerce platform provider. This was a move that enhanced SAP’s CRM capabilities aimed at supporting retail organizations. Oracle, for its part, has also been enhancing its retail capabilities over the past few years through acquisitions of companies like BlueKai, Endeca and Maxymiser. Launching a...
Dreamforce 2015: Focus on Insight-Driven Customer Success

Dreamforce 2015: Focus on Insight-Driven Customer Success

I spent last week at Salesforce.com’s annual user conference: Dreamforce. Similar to years past, the event was massive. Its 150,000 registrants (end-users, technology and service providers, as well as analysts like myself) took over downtown San Francisco. Salesforce has selected a new theme each year for the event – going with themes such as “Customer-Connected Company” and “Internet of Customers” – but it appears they found a consistent theme with last year’s “Customer Success” and will be sticking with it for the near future. As anticipated, Salesforce used the event to announce numerous new capabilities: 1. Salesforce IQ This is an offering unique to small businesses. The product integrates with e-mail clients such as Microsoft Outlook and Gmail, and uses analytics to identify the nature of email conversations to aid in managing customer interactions. For example, if a sales rep at a start-up is interacting with a prospect via email and discussing a live demo of their product, Salesforce would detect the discussion. It would then automatically input this information into the CRM to create a record of the account interaction, allowing sales managers to track the status of potential deals. This capability holds significant potential in terms of ensuring that account interactions are updated in the CRM in a timely fashion – requiring minimal-to-no sales rep time for inputting information. During the keynote, Parker Harris, co-founder and CTO of Salesforce mentioned that the company went back to its roots when designing some if its new offerings and so it’s no wonder that Salesforce IQ is primarily designed to help sales teams. However, considering the interconnected nature of customer interactions and the role both service and marketing play...
Dreamforce Moves Past Salesforce to Become Main Event for SaaS

Dreamforce Moves Past Salesforce to Become Main Event for SaaS

Every once in a while a vendor’s user conference becomes bigger than the host company, growing into something that encompasses a whole industry. We saw this happen before with VMware’s VMworld, and now we are seeing the same thing happen with Salesforce.com’s Dreamforce conference, which has truly become a massive industry show for everyone interested in SaaS, cloud and using these technologies to improve customer relations. Looking at the recent Dreamforce 2014 in San Francisco, we see all of the hallmarks of a massive industry event. High profile keynote speakers like Hillary Clinton? Check. Celebrity product endorsers like Will.i.am? It got started in there. Tons of attendees? According to Salesforce, there were over 140,000 attendees registered for Dreamforce. Definitely this has become a huge conference. But it is still Salesforce.com’s show and they had their own key announcements to make. Chief among these was the introduction of Wave, an integrated analytics cloud for customers who want to dig deeper into their customer data. And they also introduced Lightning, a code free and modular platform for businesses wanting to build their own mobile applications to run on the Salesforce1 platform. But what did these announcements mean to people on the show floor in San Francisco. Among the 140,000 attendees at Dreamforce were three of Aberdeen’s analysts, and they have their own insights and views of the recent Dreamforce conference. Peter Ostrow, Principal Analyst, Sales Effectiveness at the Aberdeen Group, was, no surprise, focused on how the announcements and information from Dreamforce will impact sales (though for the record he enjoyed Bruno Mars). With the focus on analytics via Wave and...
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