Email Marketing Anatomy: Dissecting An Effective Presidential Campaign Email

Email Marketing Anatomy: Dissecting An Effective Presidential Campaign Email

  Email marketing is a vital part of almost all comprehensive modern marketing organizations. Aberdeen Group’s CMO’s Agenda, 2016: What’s Effective & What Needs Fixing? (February 2016) pulled from a data set that showed 88% of all marketers practice some form of email marketing. Of course, there are plenty of marketers who must operate in the political arena, and they too must adhere to email marketing best practices. This is why, in the email below, with the candidate’s name redacted to maintain impartiality, of course, you see a sample of an expertly crafted email.     Now, what’s so great about this email? It seems pretty simple, straightforward, and not that flashy. Well, for starters, that is an important piece of criteria; the form of the email suits its function without any unnecessary distractions. To make the takeaways from this email as clear as possible, though, below, is the email with key points called out.   To mirror the brief, easy to consume structure of this email, I’m not going to say much more than what’s noted in the dissected image above. The most important takeaway, though, is to have a formula for email campaigns; test it, perfect it, and use it as needed. Do you have any email formulas you’d like to share? Please highlight them in the comments...
What Does Microsoft’s Acquisition of Linkedin Mean for Marketing and Sales?

What Does Microsoft’s Acquisition of Linkedin Mean for Marketing and Sales?

On Monday, June 13th 2016, Microsoft announced a $26.2 billion acquisition of Linkedin. Terms of this acquisition have been reported to be unanimously accepted by both organizations, but beyond the benefits to these two soon-to-be-merged businesses, this news has significant bearing across multiple markets. In the spheres of marketing and sales, customer experience, and even human capital management (HCM) the intersection of the offerings of both Microsoft and Linkedin have sizable implications. While my colleagues Omer Minkara, and Howard Adamsky share their insights on customer experience and HCM in their own posts (which are well worth a look/click as well), what follows is my synopsis specifically on marketing and sales. In the world of marketing and sales, individually, Microsoft and Linkedin have been dominant players in their own respective ways. Through its Dynamics platform, Microsoft has positioned itself as a system record for both vital sales functions as a CRM, and through marketing automation integrations, a driver of sophisticated marketing campaigns. For individual sales reps, Linkedin has also been an invaluable source of prospecting information and research, and from a marketing standpoint, a highly valuable source for pulling in contact data, and pushing out engaging communications or highly targeted advertisements. With this merger, the primary implication is that these two companies are addressing a significant gap in the present marketing and sales market place. Organizations can purchase solutions to store, manage, and organize data and workflows from one place, and then must go elsewhere to actually get names, or share content that furthers demand or purchase intent. Traditionally, such business users would then have to try to understand their buyers based...
Does Your Company Have a “Value Center”?

Does Your Company Have a “Value Center”?

When I finished my post yesterday, I wasn’t entirely satisfied with the conclusion. I had started with a rather bold statement – “Stop thinking of marketing as a cost center!” – but then ended on a decidedly squishy note – “We really need to think of marketing as something else! I just don’t know what.” Long story short, it was eating at me. So, to finally make the pain go away, I thought of something. Here it is: Marketing is neither a cost center nor a profit center. Marketing is a value center. What do I mean by this? Let me just say up front, I’m fairly allergic to binary oppositions. Yes, our digital world privileges them and, in point of fact, one can do some pretty spectacular things based solely on either/or logic (have you played the new Black Ops DLC?). But, when I hear that there are only two options, I tend to think that we’re missing something (and not only because, any choice between x and y always includes a third element – the chooser – as well as a fourth element – the situation that contains both the chooser and the choices. I’ll leave discussions of the fifth element till later). So, we have cost centers: functions that we need to cover (like AP), but that don’t generate revenue. We also have profit centers, which generate revenue despite their concomitant costs. Can it really be true that there is no third option? Particularly given the fact, as I’ve argued, that marketing doesn’t neatly fit into either category? Enter the Value Center I would like to suggest that marketing occupies a special area I call...
Stop Thinking of Marketing as a Cost Center

Stop Thinking of Marketing as a Cost Center

Twice today, in two different places, I’ve come across the notion that “marketing is a cost center.” I first encountered this belief in a recent report, published by The Economist and sponsored by Marketo, The Rise of the Marketer: Driving Engagement, Experience, and Revenue. The report features these two graphs illustrating the changing perception of the marketing function: As you can see, the majority (68%) say that marketing is viewed as a cost center today and, unfortunately, that perception is only expected to change a little (3%) over the next 3-5 years. In contradistinction to this view, a similar majority (69%) of marketers say that business owners treat marketing as a revenue driver. What’s more, they are very optimistic that this perception will change for the better (10%) in the foreseeable future. The idea that “marketing is a cost center” was also repeated, albeit negatively, in a piece from NewsCred entitled, “How NewsCred Does Content Marketing.” There you can read, “Unlike common perceptions, we believe that marketing is a revenue driver, not a cost center.” [Emphasis in the original] The post goes on to explain that, “Today, marketing drives 40% of NewsCred’s revenue on a first-touch basis, and influences 100% of deals. The best news? Content marketing is our most cost-efficient channel! For every $1 we put in, we get $14 out.” Why am I Surprised? Before going any further, I really need to make a confession: I’m not a business person by training. I have a PhD in German Studies and eventually wound up in marketing roles because I can write and talk good. Thanks to my meandering career path, I never took a...
Online Industrial Marketing Starts with Great Content

Online Industrial Marketing Starts with Great Content

More and more research in the industrial sector is being conducted online. There’s a study of 2015 digital media use in the industrial sector published by the firm IHS Engineering360, for instance, which found that 77 percent of engineers use digital media to find parts, services and suppliers. So, as we’ve recently written on our own blog, your online industrial marketing efforts should be prioritized accordingly. But what does such a shift look like and where does it begin? Does it entail hiring an advertising agency to produce polished banner ads for your favorite trade publication? I’d suggest step one is a little easier to execute, and that you’re already in possession of all the tools you need to get started. Though a shiny new website or a banner ad on your favorite trade publication’s website might turn out to be good tactics further down the line, they should be built on a solid foundation of well-researched, informative content living on your site. Guest post by Kyle Fiehler, copywriter at Gorilla 76. The importance of content to online industrial marketing As the post I linked to above lays out in detail, informative content is the linchpin of an effective online industrial marketing strategy. While I definitely recommend checking out the entirety of that post, I’ll try to summarize here: Your customers are looking for answers online. The above study, as well as data from search engines like Bing and Google, proves it. When you provide answers to those questions in the place your customers are looking (the web), you become associated with the experts. If the information you’re providing is...
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